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Types of Psychological Therapy

Therapy can help you explore your thoughts, feelings, and behaviours in a safe and supportive environment. It can help you gain insight into your emotions and behaviours, learn coping skills, and develop strategies to manage your symptoms. Therapy can also help you build healthier relationships, improve self-esteem, and work towards your goals.

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Types of Therapy 

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

CBT is a time-sensitive, structured, present-oriented psychotherapy that has been scientifically tested and found to be effective in more than 2,000 studies for the treatment of many different health and mental health conditions.  CBT understands problems by considering the interaction between environment, thoughts, feelings, physical sensations and behaviours. If we change one of these we can alter all the others. When we’re low or upset, we often fall into patterns of thinking and responding which can worsen how we feel. CBT works to help us notice and change problematic thinking styles or behaviour patterns so we can feel better. 

THOUGHTS CREATE FEELINGS

FEELINGS CREATE BEHAVIOUR

BEHAVIOUR REINFORCES THOUGHTS

CBT is a collaborative therapy - it’s not something that is done to someone, it’s a way of working together with a therapist on mutually agreed goals.

What can CBT help with?


CBT works for lots of different people and problems, and is widely recommended by national treatment guidelines across the UK, EU and North America. CBT is recommended for many different problems, including:

  • anxiety disorders (including panic attacks)

  • depression

  • obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)

  • post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

  • psychosis and schizophrenia

  • bipolar disorder

  • eating disorders

  • tinnitus

  • insomnia

 

There is also evidence that CBT is helpful in helping people cope with the symptoms of many other conditions, including:

  • chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)

  • irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

  • fibromyalgia

  • chronic pain

If you think Cognitive Behavioural Therapy may be the method you require, consult with me today to discuss your needs.

Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT)

DBT is an evidence-based treatment with its primary aim is to give people the skills to regulate their emotions, handle stress in a healthy manner, and improve relationships, and live mindfully. Originally developed to treat people with borderline personality disorder, DBT is now used to treat a variety of mental conditions and is believed to be especially helpful for people with seemingly uncontrollable, intense negative emotions or those who may incline toward self-harm. The skills focus on techniques for both ‘change’ and ‘acceptance’ and on balancing the two.

What can DBT help with?

DBT is helpful in helping people cope with the symptoms of many other conditions, including:

  • borderline personality disorder (BPD)

  • Self-harm

  • Suicide attempts

  • Depression

  • Drug and alcohol problems

  • Eating problems

The aim of DBT is to help you:

  • Understand and accept your difficult feelings

  • Learn skills to manage these feelings

  • Become able to make positive changes in your life

If you think Dialectical Behavioural Therapy may be the method you require, consult with me today to discuss your needs.

Dialectical Behavioural Therapy DBT Therapist in London

Eye Movement and Desensitisation and Reprocessing Therapy (EMDR)

EMDR is a powerful scientifically proven psychotherapy to help people recover from traumatic events in their lives which have led to poor mental health. It stops difficult memories causing so much distress by helping the brain to reprocess them properly, working with memory to heal the legacy of past pain. EMDR therapy is best known for treating PTSD but can help with a range of mental health conditions in people of all ages including depression and anxiety.

Eye Movement Therapy London
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